Lemon Thyme and Ginger

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar, recipe.

Is there such a thing as a healthy snack”? I am not talking about fruit and vegetables, more like a granola bar type of snack. They are so convenient to have for traveling, or just when you are on the go. Recently, I set out on a mission to discover recipes for homemade snack bars that taste great, are nutritious, and low in refined sugar. Not a snack bar that is as heavy as a door stop and tastes like cardboard, (the vegetarian baked goods of the early 70’s still haunt me), but something lighter for a quick pick-me-up in the afternoon.

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar, recipe.

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar, recipe.

This all started because I made a pledge several years ago. I promised to myself that if there was a dessert or treat I really wanted to eat, like cookies, I would make it and not buy it. Store bought cookies are not allowed in the house. I do this to control my snacking binges and it really works. Phase two, of my pledge is to add more items on my list, like snack bars. Honestly, I haven’t bought them since I made the pledge, so I am not eating them. However, we need a better stock of snacks in our pantry, so I don’t binge on crackers or chips.

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar, recipe.

Over the past two weeks I have scoured the internet looking for solid recipes in the granola bar category. Each one had large amounts of sugar and they were all in “soft” snack bar variety.  Don’t people want crunchy snack bars? Don’t people crave that crunchy texture and is one of the reasons why chips are so damn good? I like crunchy granola bars so I will table this quest for another day.

One recipe caught my attention from the cookbook “Life In Balance”, by Donna Hay. The cookbook features several snack recipes all made with whole foods and good health in mind. It is not a crunchy granola bar, but all the ingredients are nutritious and foods I enjoy. I choose the Cacao, Banana, Date, and Cashew Bars recipe to test today, because it meets all my requirements, except being crunchy. Another bonus, I had all the ingredients except the cashews. However, I did have a bag of walnuts for an easy substitution. Also, this recipe allowed me to use up some bananas that were getting too ripe.

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar, recipe.

What I like about this snack bar is there is no refined sugar, no flour, and no dairy. It is filled with natural cocoa powder, bananas, fresh dates, walnuts, and a little vegetable oil. The 4 wholesome ingredients get puréed in a food processor then baked until firm. They taste like a bittersweet fudgy chocolate brownie. The cocoa flavor stands out, but it is not as bitter because of the dates, bananas, and walnuts. I would like them to be a little denser with more variation in texture, but the taste is very pleasing. If you crave a sweet fix for your snacks and love dark chocolate, this is the snack for you.

More snack foods  for a light meal or picnic

Stuffed Pastry with Swiss Chard and Feta

Irish Cheese Platter

Pork Dumplings

Smoky-Maple Apple Dutch Baby

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar, recipe.

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar, recipe.

All the ingredients are nutritious in their own right, but mixed together they make a nutritious snack bar that won’t weight you down with extra fat and sugar. According to My Calorie Counter from Fitness Pal, each snack bar has 228 calories, 21 g carbs, 17 g fat, 0 cholesterol, 3 g protein, 4 mg sodium, 14 g sugar, and 4 g fiber.

 

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 1 hour

Category: Snack

12 bars

Serving Size: 1 snack bar

Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar

Cocoa, bananas, dates, and walnuts are blended together then slowly baked for a healthy snack alternative. Perfect for the times when you need a little something and you are on the run. These snack bars are made with all-natural ingredients, without processed flours and refined sugars. The original recipe uses cashews so if you prefer, feel free to substitute the walnut with your favorite nuts. They are gluten free, dairy free, and vegan.

This recipe is slightly adapted form Donna Hay's cookbook, "Life In Balance"

Store in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup (35 g) natural unsweetened cocoa
  • 3/4 cup (180 g) firmly packed chopped pitted fresh dates (9-10 dates)
  • 1/4 cup (60 ml) vegetable oil
  • 1 1/4 cup (200 g) chopped walnuts
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 3/4 cup (200 g) mashed bananas (2-3 bananas)
  • coconut flakes for sprinkling

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven for 325°F (160°C). Line an 8 x 8 inch pan (20 cm x 20 cm) pan with parchment paper. Use two strips wide enough to cover the bottom of the pan and long enough to extend up and over the sides of the pan. One strip will crisscross the other, so all the sides of the pan are covered. This is so you can easily lift out the snack bars and cut them.
  2. Place all the ingredients, expect the coconut flakes, in a food processor and blend until smooth.
  3. Plop the cocoa, fruit and nut mixture into the parchment lined pan, then spread evenly across the bottom.
  4. Sprinkle with the coconut flakes.
  5. Bake for 40 minutes, or until firm to touch. Set the timer for 35 minutes to check and gauge the progress. Continue baking as needed.
  6. Cool completely in the pan. Remove the cocoa banana nut snack bar out of the pan by lifting the sides of the parchment paper and placing it on a cutting board. Make one slice across the middle, then six even slices across each half making 12 snack bars. Store the snack bars in an air tight container in the refrigerator. Will last for to one week.
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Cocoa Banana Nut Snack Bar. An easy recipe for a healthy snack. No refined sugar or flours. Gluten free and vegan

© 2018, Ginger Smith- Lemon Thyme and Ginger. All rights reserved.

Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce

Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce, recipe.

A few years ago, I offered to bring a dessert for our Russian themed book club meeting. Our theme had nothing to do with the current US and Russian political climate, but was literary based around a love story from a classic Russian novella by Sergeevish Turgenev. At the time, the possibility of Russia interfering with the 2016 election was not even a blip in our imagination. Our job was to decipher the leads told throughout a melodramatic Russian love story and form an opinion if “First Love” was the definitive love story written in the 19th century. The task was not as insurmountable as it sounds, but my bigger concern lay with what should I bring for dessert?

After reading the story, and not feeling enthusiastic about it, I waltzed into researching ideas for a “Russian” dessert. It did not take long to discover a meringue dessert created to honor the Russian prima ballerina Anna Pavlova. Pavlova is a dessert consisting of a meringue nest filled with whipped cream and seasonal fresh fruit. Each bite is a choreographed dance of sensual textures and flavors. It is soft and crispy, sweet and tart, and as light as a ballerina pirouetting on a cloud.

Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce, recipe.

Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce, recipe.

In 1926 and 1928, Anna Pavlova toured with her ballet company to Australia and New Zealand. Her world tours were as anticipated as the Beatles and considered a major event for both countries. Chefs in Australia and New Zealand built on the excitement and honored her by creating and naming a meringue cake in her honor. Both countries have a long-standing dispute over the origin of the pavlova, inspired by the dancer’s tutu. The pavlova turned out to be as captivating as the ballerina’s graceful dancing, growing in popularity around the world for almost a hundred years. There is evidence that neither country created this meringue cake, but they did influence in its legacy. A true love story in its’ own right.

Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce, recipe.

How to Make a Pavlova

Unlike other meringues, like my peppermint meringue cookies, that are crispy through and through, a pavlova has a crispy outside and a creamy-marshmallow center. A small amount of corn starch makes this marshmallow middle possible. The luscious contrast in texture is one reason for the dessert’s popularity.

Making a pavlova is not difficult, but like all meringues they are temperamental. The right conditions, cool dry air, and slowly adding sugar to the developing meringue are key to success. Another important factor is making sure your mixing bowl and beaters, or whisk, are clean. Any oil or fat residue will prevent the eggs whites from developing into an airy cloud. A new trick I just learned is clean out your mixing bowl and beaters with distilled vinegar then wipe the bowl and beaters dry with a lint free cloth. This extra step will ensure your bowl is free of any traces of fat.

Once the egg whites are all glossy and fluffy, bake the meringue in a low temperature oven. Don’t peek. Keep the door shut throughout the cooking and cooling process. Like a soufflé, meringue deflates when exposed to air before it is set.

Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce, recipe.

Meringues are very sweet, so I offset the sweetness with tart fruit and lightly sweetened whipped cream. Adding extra sweet fruit, jams, fruit curds, or sauces makes the pavlova cloyingly sweet. Passion fruit has a tart flavor and is perfect with meringue. If you can find fresh passion fruit scoop out the flesh and seeds and drizzle it over the whipped cream for a dramatic affect. Otherwise you can buy frozen passion fruit pulp in the freezer section of your grocery store. I made a sauce  with the passion fruit with a little sugar and reduced it slightly. Resist the temptation to add more sugar. The sauce is tart by itself, but combined with the sweet meringue, the tart flavor subsides.

Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce, recipe.

Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce, recipe.

Switch it up

For a dairy free option, make whipped cream with coconut cream found in full fat coconut milk.

For a vegan option make the meringue with Aquafaba, chickpea water, and use coconut milk whipped cream. Top with fruit and passion fruit sauce.

For more lemon flavor add 1 TB fresh lemon juice to the finished meringue. Fold it in with the lemon zest, corn starch. Omit the vinegar.

Add 1 1/2 teaspoons of unsweetened natural coco powder for a chocolate Pavlova. Fold in the coco powder with the corn starch until no streaks are left. (omit the lemon zest in this recipe)

My pavlova recipe is adapted from  Ina Garten, Barefoot Contessa, Mixed Berry Pavlova.

Lemon Pavlova with Passion Fruit and Kiwi

Prep Time: 25 minutes

Cook Time: 2 hours, 30 minutes

Total Time: 2 hours, 55 minutes

Category: Dessert

6-8

Pavlova is a sweet, airy and show stopper dessert made with meringue that is crispy with a creamy center. Covered with lightly sweetened whipped cream and fresh fruit, a pavlova is a spectacle to see and eat. A very elegant dessert named after the Russian ballerina Anna Pavlova. For best results, assemble the pavlova just before serving.

This recipe is adapted from Ina Garten, Mixed Berry Pavlova

Ingredients

  • 5 egg whites, about 1/2 cup (125 ml)
  • 1 cup (7 oz/ 202 g) granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp distilled vinegar
  • 2 tsp cornstarch
  • Zest from 1 lemon
  • 1 cup (250 ml) heavy cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 TB powdered sugar
  • 1 kiwi, peeled and sliced thin,
  • 3/4 cup (185 ml) frozen passion fruit pulp, or one fresh passion fruit
  • 1-2 TB granulated sugar (if using pulp)
  • Berries and fresh mint to garnish

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 180°F/ 82°C and place the oven rack in the middle position.
  2. Draw a 9 inch (23 cm) circle in the middle of a piece of parchment paper large enough to cover a large rimmed baking sheet. Turn the paper over, and place the parchment paper on your baking sheet. The drawn side is facing down. Set aside.
  3. Wipe your mixing bowl and beaters with some distilled vinegar then wipe dry with a lint free cloth.
  4. Add the egg whites with a small pinch of Kosher salt to a bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment. Turn the speed to medium-high and whisk until the egg whites become foamy and hold soft peaks.
  5. With the motor running add the sugar one tablespoon at a time, whisking between each addition. This will take some time, about 5 minutes, but it prevents the egg whites from deflating. When all the sugar is added, turn the speed up to high and beat until the egg whites are glossy and hold stiff peaks and all the sugar is dissolved, about 2-3 minutes. Test if the sugar is dissolved by rubbing a small piece of whipped egg whites between your fingers. If it feels course, then the sugar has not fully dissolved. If so, continue beating the egg whites or a minute more, but be careful to not over beat the meringue because it will deflate.
  6. Remove the bowl from the mixer and sift the cornstarch over the meringue. Add the lemon zest and vinegar then carefully fold the ingredients into the meringue until evenly combined.
  7. Pour the meringue on to the parchment paper aiming for the middle of your circle. Spread out the meringue to evenly fill the circle.
  8. Bake for 1.5 hours then turn off the oven. Keep the oven door closed no peeking. Cool the meringue in the oven for an hour, or until it reaches room temperature.
  9. You can make the meringue a day ahead and store in an airtight container on the counter. A cool oven is a great place to store the meringue overnight. Do not refrigerate.
    Passion Fruit Sauce
  1. Pour the passion fruit sauce into a medium saucepan. Turn the heat to medium-high and add 1 TB of the sugar. Whisk to combine and bring to a gentle simmer. Taste add another tablespoon of sugar if needed. Remember the meringue is very sweet so keep the passion fruit sauce on the tart side. Whisk to combine and simmer. Cook until the sauce begins to thicken and slightly reduces. Turn off the heat and pour the sauce into a heat proof container. Cool to room temperature.
    Make the Whipped Cream
  1. Add the chilled heavy cream to a medium bowl and whip with a hand held mixer, or use a free standing mixer, until just starting to thicken. Add the vanilla extract and sugar and beat until soft peaks form. Cover and keep refrigerated until needed.
    Assemble the Pavlova
  1. Just before serving, slowly peel away the parchment paper from the meringue. A thin spatula helps release any stubborn parts. Slide the meringue onto a serving plate, then layer with the whipped cream. Scatter the fruit on top of the whipped cream then drizzle with the passion fruit or some of the sauce. Garnish with fresh mint if using.
  2. Serve immediately with extra sauce.
  3. Once assembled, pavlovas do not keep very long because the whipped cream makes the meringue soggy. You can cover any leftovers with aluminum foil and keep in the refrigerator for one day with the understanding some of the crispiness will subside.

Notes

Meringues are temperamental to humid condition. Store in an air tight container until needed. A cool oven is the best place to store a meringue, just make sure you don't accidentally turn it on. You can also make 6 - 8 small nests instead of one big one. Each meringue then gets a large dollop of whipped cream and fresh fruit.

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Lemon Pavlova with Kiwi and Passion Fruit Sauce, recipe.

© 2017, Ginger Smith- Lemon Thyme and Ginger. All rights reserved.

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread Recipe

I have a few recipes that stand the test of time, is always there when I need it, and never fails me. This pumpkin bread recipe is one of them. It is always a crowd pleaser and it is so easy to make. If this recipe could talk, it would tell many tales of my children’s’ preschool snack time, their school bake sales, our weekends away visiting friends, homemade gifts, learning how to bake, swim meets, college care packages, and easy mornings at home.

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread recipe

Some foods and recipes are like that. They exist as part of our collective experience spanning a family’s history and time well spent with friends, teachers, colleagues, neighbors and family. They are treasured artifacts in the family archives. For me, I have a couple symbolic recipes that mark my parent’s heritage, but very few. Hopefully, I generated a selection of treasured recipes for my children to remember their childhood by, and create new ones that hold a special place in our growing family’s future.

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread Recipe

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread Recipe

My pumpkin bread is a throwback recipe from the 70’s when I was in high school. A dear friend gave me the recipe. I cannot remember what initiated this gift, but I believe she just wanted to share it. Harriot and her family loved to cook and were always generous with recipes and information about food. Whenever I was at their house, someone was in the kitchen making something. If I remember correctly, Harriot and I had a few cooking adventures of our own.

Besides the delicious taste, this pumpkin bread recipe has a couple of great features. One, it is easy to make and second, it makes two loaves. After all these years, I still can’t believe one small can of pumpkin purée makes two loaves of pumpkin bread. There is no need to measure out a cup of pumpkin mash and worry about what to make with the rest. That is a real pet peeve of mine. It is not the case for this pumpkin bread. One recipe, one can of pumpkin purée, two loaves of spicy pumpkin bread. A practical quick bread recipe.

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread Recipe

Because it is so easy to make, it is perfect for a baking project with young children, or anyone who wants to learn how to bake. This recipe rarely fails. However, if it has been a while since you used baking powder or baking soda, make sure the leaveners are fresh. There was only one time this pumpkin bread did bake properly. Once, after I gave this recipe to a friend who said she couldn’t bake, she made it and came over to share it with me. She was so proud of her accomplishment I did not have the heart to tell her the bread did not rise. When that happens it usually means the baking powder and baking soda lost their leavening powers. Still, it tasted great and hopefully she kept on baking.

More family favorite recipes:

Pasta with Ham and Spring Vegetables

Swedish Apple Pie

Pineapple Stuffing

The spices are a mixture of cinnamon, allspice and a generous amount of ground clove. Not all pumpkin bread recipes include ground cloves, and I believe they fall flat. There is twice as much cinnamon and allspice to cloves in each loaf, yet the ground cloves gently stand out. I like that the cinnamon does not dominate the spicy favor. Often, after I serve pumpkin bread to friends I get a delighted question, “Oh nice. What spice am I tasting? ” My anser is always received with a surprised and happy expression, “It’s clove.”

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread Recipe

Over the years I have made a few variations of this pumpkin bread, but I keep coming back to the original. I made it with canned pumpkin purée and fresh pumpkin purée. With orange zest, crumble topping, candied ginger, and different flours. Each variation slightly changes the texture of the bread. I discovered, the fresh pumpkin makes an airier bread. Also, I noticed the crust is crispier with the fresh pumpkin.

If you want to use fresh pumpkin, roast wedges of sugar pumpkin in a 400°F (200°C) oven until very tender. Scrape the roasted pumpkin from its’ peel and purée in a food processor, or blender until smooth. Cool and refrigerate or freeze until ready to use. Best Pumpkins to bake with. 

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread Recipe

I should call this Friendship Bread, because the recipe is enjoying a life span of over 40 plus years and growing. I never thought twice about sharing it with friends and family. The name Friendship Bread is already taken, so Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread it stays. A treasured heirloom for sharing over the years to come.

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 1 hour

Total Time: 1 hour, 15 minutes

Category: Breakfast or Snack

Cuisine: American

about 14 slices

Serving Size: 1 slice of bread

Family Favorite Pumpkin Bread

This pumpkin bread is one of my family's all-time favorite recipes, and the most requested recipe from friends. It's a keeper. It is the perfect baking recipe for new cooks and young children. There is no fancy equipment required, just a large mixing bowl, mixing spoon and 2 loaf pans. All you need to do is measure, stir, then bake. This is a great breakfast treat, or an after-school snack with apple slices or an orange.

The pumpkin bread will last covered in plastic wrap or an air-tight container for 4 days unrefrigerated. It freezes well when tightly sealed with several layers of plastic wrap, or one layer of plastic wrap and a layer of aluminum foil.

Ingredients

  • 4 cups (574 g) all-purpose flour
  • 2 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp baking powder
  • 1 1/2 tsp Kosher salt
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp ground allspice
  • 1/2 tsp ground cloves
  • 3 cups (613 g) granulated sugar
  • 1 15 oz can (425 g) pumpkin purée or 1 lb (453 g) fresh pumpkin purée
  • 1 cup (250 ml) vegetable or canola oil
  • 2/3 cup (150 ml) cold water
  • 4 large eggs

Instructions

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350° F (175° C / Gas Mark 4)
  2. Prepare 2- 9 x 5 inch (24 x 13.5 cm) loaf pans. Lightly grease with butter or oil spray, then line the bottom of each pan with parchment paper. Set aside.
  3. Sift the flour, baking soda, baking powder, Kosher salt, cinnamon allspice, and clove into a large mixing bowl. Then whisk the ingredients in the bowl until you see all the spices are evenly mixed in the flour. Add the sugar and whisk together until combined.
  4. Make a well in the center of the flour mixture, then add the pumpkin purée, oil, and water. Stir until just combined. Using a rubber spatula or spoon, scrape along the bottom and sides of the bowl to get everything thoroughly mixed.
  5. Add the eggs, one at a time, and mix thoroughly with each addition.
  6. Pour the batter into the prepared pans, about 3/4 full.
  7. Place the bread pans in the oven and bake for one hour, or until a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean.
  8. Cool in pan for 10 minutes on a cooling rack, then remove the pumpkin bread from their pans.
  9. Cool on the cooling rack before serving.
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© 2017, Ginger Smith- Lemon Thyme and Ginger. All rights reserved.

Almond Cherry Peach Galette

In the Hudson Valley, the month of August produces the crown jewels of the summer produce. At last, local tomatoes, corn and peaches are ready for picking. At last. It feels like I waited all summer for this event and now it is peach picking time. I am now ready to taste and cook peaches from every orchard in the Hudson Valley. First baking item on the agenda from this August bounty, is a peach galette.

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

Almond Peach Galette recipe

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

I love making galettes. There is less pressure making a galette, because simplicity is the appeal. A pie made with a fancy decorative crust is stunning to look at, but I will save those for the holidays. For my day-to-day dessert, galettes fit the bill. There is more fruit to crust ratio in a galette, but it still has a crispy buttery crust to contrast with the tender fruit filling.

For this recipe, I scaled up the preparation a degree to produce a galette with a tender crispy crust with no soggy bottom, and enable the galette to keep its shape. To do this, I chill the galette dough at three different steps. First, I chill the dough right after I make it. Later, I chill the dough after I finish rolling it into a circle. The third and final chill happens after I fill the galette with fruit and shape it. This last step, is not a typical one, nor is it necessary, but it helps the galette keep its shape when baking and creates a flaky crust. Each time the dough is chilled, the gluten in the dough relaxes and the butter stays cold.

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

Another upgrade is, I added a layer of almond paste to my traditional fruit galette recipe. The almond paste has two purposes, add extra depth of nutty flavor to the peaches, and create a barrier between the fruit and the dough. This protective layer prevents the fruit juices from soaking the crust and making it soggy. There is nothing worse than a soggy bottom galette or pie.

I thinned the almond paste with dark rum so it will spread easily across the dough. Almonds and rum pair perfectly with the peaches and cherries and makes the peach galette have more depth of flavor. The almond paste does not overwhelm the peaches because the rum balances the flavor with notes of caramel and warmth. Look for almond paste in the baking aisle of your grocery store. If you do not like nuts, or are allergic to them, omit the almond paste and baste a layer of egg wash over the crust before you add the fruit.

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

One last upgrade I added is a trick I learned from The Art of Pie, by Kate McDermott. Before placing the fruit filling over the galette dough, drain the fruit juices into a bowl, then reduce the juice in a sauce pan on the stove. Not only does this step lessen the amount of fruit juices, but it concentrates the flavor as well. Each peach galette I made this summer, the peaches had a lot of juice. I never can tell how much fruit juice there will be. This extra step is not necessary, because the cornstarch will thicken up the juices, but it won’t hurt either.

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

This summer I learned something new about the different types of peaches. I am a little embarrassed about this discovery, but I always thought the “cling” of cling peaches, is just a name, like a Granny Smith apple. However, I learned “cling” has specific meaning and it’s obvious, duh, and I feel stupid for not realizing this earlier. There are two types of peaches with many variations of each type, cling peaches and free stone peaches.  A cling peach, is a peach with its flesh tightly attached to the pit. The peach clings to the stone. A free stone peach, the peach flesh is not attached to the pit. The peach is free from the stone and easy to cut a peach in half and pull it apart. When I read this, I gave myself a whack on the forehead. Duh! Why did I not realize this before?

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

I always believed when peach flesh sticks to the pit, it means the peach is not completely ripe. Actually, I never heard the name free stone peach until this project. In my defense, it is possible I never ate a free stone peach before, but I would love to find some. Prying the flesh of cling peaches away from their pits is slippery and challenging. I get concerned about cutting my hand with my knife, and/or squish the peaches from gripping them to stay in place.

These additional steps take some time, but they create a delicious peach galette. One that is rich and bright in flavor from the almonds, peaches and cherries, with a crispy all butter crust. Keep these additional steps in your back pocket and use when you wish to up your galette making skills. Time is the unwritten ingredient for this recipe, but it is an important one to make a great crust.

Almond Peach Galette Recipe

Almond Cherry Peach Galette

Prep Time: 3 hours

Cook Time: 45 minutes

Total Time: 3 hours, 45 minutes

Category: Dessert

Cuisine: French

8 servings

Almond Cherry Peach Galette

The rich almond paste and tart cherries compliment the sweet flavor of fresh peaches. Extra steps are taken in this recipe to create a light and flaky all butter crust. The almond paste creates a barrier over the dough so the fruit won’t make it soggy. If you are not a fan of nuts, the galette will still taste delicious without the almond paste.

You can substitute the peaches with any stone fruit, like nectarines, plums or apricots, but keep in mind you will need about 1 1/2 lbs - 2 lbs (1 K k) of fruit. Peaches should be peeled, but nectarines, apricots or plums do not. I love peaches and cherries, but feel free to substitute with some berries if you prefer. The berries will add more liquid to the galette.

When you make this, just make sure you plan ahead. I added up the 3 different times the dough needs to chill in the prep time section. So, most of the prep is unattended. Often, I make the dough the night before to ease up on the time needed the day of baking the galette.

Ingredients

    Pie Dough
  • 1 cup (142 g / 5 oz) all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup (66 g / 2 1/4 oz) whole wheat pastry flour
  • 2 TB extra fine sugar (castor sugar)
  • 1 small pinch of Kosher salt
  • 6 TB (86 g / 3 oz) cold unsalted butter
  • 5 TB ice water
    Almond Peach Filling
  • 3.5 oz (101 g) almond paste
  • 2 TB dark rum
  • 12 raw almonds, lightly toasted and finely chopped
  • 1 1/2 - 2 lb (750 g - 1 k) ripe peaches
  • 1/2 cup (110 g) granulated sugar
  • 2 TB corn starch
  • Zest from 1 lemon
  • 1 TB fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 tea fresh grated nutmeg (a small pinch if you are using store bought ground nutmeg)
  • 12 -15 (150 g) fresh cherries, pitted and sliced in half
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • Course Sugar
  • 1 TB butter

Instructions

    Make the pie dough
  1. Cut the butter into small cubes. Place in a small bowl and keep in the refrigerator until needed.
  2. In a medium bowl mix the all-purpose flour and the whole wheat pastry flour together with a fork or whisk, until evenly mixed. Add the salt and sugar, and whisk again until evenly combined.
  3. Add the pieces of butter to the flour and toss the butter lightly with your hands to get the butter coated with flour. Mix the butter into the flour with your hands by smushing the butter between your fingertips. You don't want your hands getting too hot and melt the butter, so handle the butter as quickly as possible. Continue mixing the butter until the mixture looks like course meal with irregular pieces of butter throughout.
  4. Add the ice water to the flour. Start with 3 TB of water and mix carefully with your hands without too much action. If the dough is dry add 2 TB of water and barely mix with your hands until it almost comes together.
  5. Dump the dough onto a clean counter and bring the dough together. Shape into a flat disk, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour or longer. The dough can be made ahead and kept tightly covered in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.
    Almond Peach Filling
  1. Pit the cherries and cut in half, then set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, mix the almond paste with the rum until it becomes a spreadable paste. Add the chopped nuts and mix. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.
  3. Fill a large pot with water and bring to a boil. Make an ice bath. Fill a large bowl with ice cubes and cold water. Set aside near your pot on the stove.
  4. Score the peaches by lightly cutting an X across the bottom end of each peach. Only cut through the skin and not deep into the flesh. Add the peaches to the big pot of just boiling water and cook for one minute. Remove them from the hot water, then add the peaches to the ice water bath to stop the cooking process and cool. Peel off the skin when they are cool enough to handle. If the peaches are ripe, the skin should easily peel off. Make a cut all around the peach to cut it in half. If you have free stone peaches twist the halves and they should easily come apart. If you have cling peaches, cut another slice around the peaches to divide the peach into 4 sections. Carefully slice your knife into the peach and around the pit until a wedge is free. Repeat for the remaining sections. Be very careful removing the pit from cling peaches. Peeled peaches are very slippery and it is easy for your hands or knife to slip. A paring knife with a thin flexible blade is the best tool.
  5. Slice the peaches into 1/4 inch - 1/2 inch (.5 - 1 cm) wedges, and add them to a large mixing bowl.
  6. Add the sugar, lemon juice, lemon zest and grated nutmeg to the peaches and gently toss to get the sugar thoroughly mixed with the peaches. If you find there is a lot of juice, drain the peach juice from the peaches using a fine mesh strainer set over a bowl to collect the juices. Pour the peach juices in a small sauce pan and turn the heat to medium-high on the stove. Return the peaches to their bowl. Reduce the peach juice by half. Add the cornstarch and reduced juice to the peaches and mix. The reduced liquid will harden but that is all right. It will melt in the oven. Set aside.
    Putting it altogether
  1. Preheat your oven at 400°F one hour before you want to bake your galette. If you have one, place a baking stone or baking steel on the rack in the middle of the oven. If not place a large sheet pan, rim side down on the oven rack. It will act like a baking stone and create a hot surface for the galette crust to get crisp.
  2. Cover a rimmed sheet pan, large enough to hold a 10-inch (25 cm) galette, with parchment paper. Set aside.
  3. Take the galette dough out of the refrigerator and rest it on the counter for 10 minutes. Lightly sprinkle flour over your clean work surface and unwrap your dough. Lightly flour your rolling pin and give your dough a few good whacks with the pin to soften it up. Turn over the dough and repeat. Repeat whacking the dough several turns to help shape the dough in a circle and thin it out.
  4. Roll the dough into a 12 inch (30.5 cm) circle. Start with the pin across the middle of the dough and roll the pin away from you. Return the pin to the middle and roll the pin towards you. Turn your galette dough 1/8th turn and repeat, rolling the dough, starting each time at the middle of the dough and roll once away, then once toward you. Repeat until you have a circle about 12- inches (30.5 cm) across and 1/4-inch (.33 - .5 cm) thick. You should get a nice shaped circle with this method. If the dough needs thinning and shaping, move your pin over to those areas roll the pin in one direction at a time.
  5. Transfer your finished galette dough to your prepared sheet pan. Place your rolling pin across the middle of your pie dough, and drape the top half of the dough over the pin towards you. Lift the pin and place it across the middle of your sheet pan and arrange the galette dough flat on the baking sheet. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 30 minutes to an hour.
  6. Assemble the galette. Place the baking sheet with the chilled galette dough on your counter. Spread the prepared almond paste across the middle of the galette dough making a circle about 9 inches (23 cm) across. Add the peaches to the galette dough by one of two methods. One- carefully arrange the peach slices in a circle around the dough, beginning 2-3 inches from the edge of the dough. Make and fill a circle with the peach slices. Make sure you overlap the slices because they will separate while baking. Add the pitted cherries into pockets of the peaches any which way you want. Or, two- add the cherries to the bowl with the peaches and dump the fruit in the center of the galette dough. Smooth the peaches out to make a nice mound over the almond paste.
  7. Fold the edge of the dough over the fruit and pleat and pinch the folds together, creating a nice and neat package.
  8. Chill the galette for 30 minutes, loosely covered with plastic wrap. This will help the galette dough keep its shape. Or, bake right away but the galette might open slightly.
  9. Just before baking, baste the folded galette dough with an egg wash, and sprinkle the dough with the course or granulated sugar. Brush away any loose sugar from the galette on the baking sheet. Scatter pieces of the butter over the peaches and sprinkle with some more sugar.
  10. Place the baking sheet with the galette in the oven and bake for 40 - 45 minutes, or until the crust is golden brown and the juices are vigorously bubbling.
  11. Remove the baking sheet with the galette from the oven and set on a cooling rack to cool. Galettes should be set and completely cooled before eating. This can take a couple of hours. When completely cooled, carefully slide the galette onto your serving plate using the parchment paper to help you. If you have any leakage, run a large spatula or knife, under the galette to loosen any stuck sections.
  12. Serve room temperature.
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© 2017, Ginger Smith- Lemon Thyme and Ginger. All rights reserved.

Cheese and Chive Herb Bread

Each year as my garden matures, the herb garden expands as well. Slowly, the herb bed has inched deeper into the precious sunny real-estate and has started replacing my lawn. I add one or two more herb plants a year and build my dream herb garden. One herb plant that is thriving is my chive plant. Fortunately, it is not growing out of control, but remains nicely contained in a tall spiky mound.

Cheese and Chives Herb Bread

Cheese and Chive Herb Bread recipe

The plant grows without a lot of disturbance because I rarely use fresh chives in my cooking. However, it needed a thinning and removal of all the spent flowers before they spread their seeds. Afterwards, I was left with a large bundle of chives and a new challenge, how to use up all the chives before they go bad. This is the type of challenge I enjoy, and inspires me to look for new ideas.

Cheese and Chive Herb Bread recipe

Cheese and Chive Herb Bread recipe

I wanted to make something different, yet easily prepared and quick to finish. What I dreamed of was a recipe from Season 3 of The Great British Baking Show, Ian’s quick bread with wild garlic. While watching the episode, the smell of the wild garlic and bread traveled across the ocean and through my television, and I have craved it ever since. Unfortunately, I could not find his recipe. Rather, I came upon a recipe, which although is not British in nature, has that oniony-bready fix I was looking for.

Cheese and Chive Herb Bread recipe

This recipe is a savory bread with chives and cheddar cheese by Dorie Greenspan on the website, Serious Eats. It was exactly what I was craving, a savory quick bread to unload my bundle of chives, and give me some immediate satisfaction. I slightly adapted her recipe, and used Gruyère cheese, chives, garlic chives, lemon thyme and nixed the walnuts.

Dorie explains in her recipe; the French refer to just about everything made in a pan as a cake. A loaf such as this, is called, “cake salé” (meaning, salty or savory cake). This is a very light and cake-like bread that is perfect as a snack or appetizer paired with wine, beer or any cocktail. Like cake, it is light and airy in texture, but it is rich in flavor from the cheese and herbs. I also enjoyed this herb bread for lunch as avocado toast with lemon thyme and a drizzle of olive oil.

Cheese and Chive Herb Bread recipe

As Dorie recommends, this is a bread recipe to play around with. Use the dough as your foundation and switch up the cheese and herbs as you wish. A traditional cake salé recipe from France uses Emmentaller, Gruyère, or a mixture with Parmesan. She made her recipe with cheddar cheese and chives for a local US inspired loaf. She also recommends other add-in substitutes like nuts, diced ham, olives, pesto and cooked vegetables.

Cheese and Chive Herb Bread recipe

More appetizer ideas:

Crispy Potato Skins- 2 ways

Spinach Artichoke Dip with Bacon

Asparagus with Orange Mayo

Making this cheese and chive herb bread is an amazing sensory treat. Every time I snipped, spread and stirred the chives, their scent came forward like an herbal wave engulfing the dough. Once in the oven, the smell of the baking herb bread filled my house with comforting aromas of melting cheese, bright onions and baking bread.

I love it when I discover something new and it turns out to be a smash hit. This recipe is so easy, I am sure to make it several times and continue to personalize it. I know something is delicious when every 5 minutes my husband and son kept repeating, “Oh, this is soo good. This is really good”. This is no exaggeration. It was all I could do to keep them from eating the whole loaf.

Cheese and Chive Herb Bread recipe

Cheesy Herb Bread

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 40 minutes

Total Time: 50 minutes

Category: Snack or appetizer

Cuisine: French - American

About 12-14 slices

Serving Size: 1 slice of bread

Cheesy Herb Bread

A savory quick bread filled with cheese and fresh herbs makes for a wonderful snack or appetizer. This pairs exceptionally well served with chilled wine or cold beer.

This recipe is adaptable to suit any mood or taste. Cheddar, Swiss, Parmesan or other hard cheeses are great fillers with a variety of fresh herbs. I like chives with lemon thyme, but basil or any combination of herbs will taste great. Anything goes with this bread.

The recipe is slightly adapted form Savory Cheddar-Chive Bread by Dorie Greenspan on www.seriouseas.com

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cup (268 g) All-purpose flour
  • 1 TB Baking powder
  • 1/2 to 1 tsp Kosher salt (amount of salt depends on the cheese and other add ins)
  • 1/4 tsp fresh ground white pepper
  • 3 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup (75 ml) whole milk, room temperature
  • 1/3 cup (75 ml) extra virgin olive oil
  • 3 oz (75 g) coarsely grated cheese like Gruyere or cheddar
  • 2 oz (50 g) diced cheese like Gruyere or cheddar
  • 1/2 cup (125 ml) minced chives or other herbs
  • 1 - 2 TB chopped lemon thyme

Instructions

  1. Set the oven rack to the middle position and pre-heat the oven to 375˚F / 190˚C / Gas Mark 5, and generously butter a loaf pan.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt and pepper until evenly combined.
  3. In a medium mixing bowl add the eggs, then whisk until well combined and somewhat frothy. Add the milk and olive oil and whisk together.
  4. Pour the egg mixture into the flour mixture and stir with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon. Mix until everything is just combined. You do not want to over work the dough and there is no need for the dough to be thoroughly mixed together. Stir until everything is just mixed, it won't be smooth.
  5. Stir in all the cheese, herbs and any other add ins you have, like chopped walnuts. The dough is thick, but carefully work in the cheese and herbs until evenly distributed. Don't overwork the dough.
  6. Scrape into your prepared loaf pan and bake for 35 to 45 minutes. The bread is done when it has a golden brown crust, and a cake tester inserted into the middle of the loaf comes out clean.
  7. Cool on a rack for 10 minutes, then run a knife around the edge of your pan and remove the bread from the pan. Cool the loaf on the rack until it is at room temperature.
  8. Best eaten the day it is made, but it will keep for a day, wrapped in plastic wrap and stored on the counter.
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